yogurt

I know I should have bought a smaller container of Greek yogurt in the first place…

We don’t normally eat yogurt by itself. In fact, we usually only have it at home when a recipe calls for it. Like Ottolenghi’s Greek yogurt baba ghanoush. But that scrumptious dish only required two tablespoons. What to do with the rest??

Blueberry Greek yogurt pancakes, of course!

blueberry Greek yogurt pancakes

blueberry Greek yogurt pancakes

The day before I made these pancakes NPR’s Morning Edition aired a special report on Smitten Kitchen during our morning breakfast ritual. Not about pancakes, the story spoke about how that now famous blogger turns out beautiful dishes in her tiny Manhattan kitchen (That sounds so familiar! Do you think that she got the idea from Julie Powell? Just a thought…)

Obviously, Deb Perelman was also promoting her new cookbook over the radio. Congratulations, Deb! She prepared latkes for Lynn Neary during the story—so not pancakes exactly but bear with me here. The following day I googled blueberry yogurt pancakes and one of Deb’s entries came up first.

So influenced by the morning news and Google’s high ranking, I decided to give the recipe a try. I didn’t have all the ingredients that she calls for. Here’s my adapted version of Smitten Kitchen’s dish.

blueberry Greek yogurt pancakes

1 large egg plus one egg white
1 cup plain, full-fat yogurt
2 to 4 tablespoons soy milk
3 tablespoons canola oil
½ teaspoon lemon zest
½ teaspoon vanilla extract
1½ cup (62 grams) whole wheat flour
2 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon sea salt
1 cup frozen blueberries, thawed
Some butter to grease the skillet

Sift together sugar, salt, flour, baking powder and set aside. In a separate bowl add egg, egg white, soy milk, lemon zest, vanilla extract. Whisk to combine then whisk in yogurt. Combine wet and dry ingredients. Add a bit more soy milk if batter seems too thick.

Place two non-stick skillets on stovetop over medium. Melt a bit of butter in each pan. Add one small ladle full of batter to each pan and cook for about 3-4 minutes on one side, sprinkle some blueberries on top, flip and cook for about 3 minutes more on other side. Continue in that way until batter used up.

Serve with butter, maple syrup and a good cup of freshly brewed black coffee.

{ 3 comments }

fish biryani

by Heguiberto on November 8, 2011

This is our recipe for the biryani cook-off that the delightful Heavenly was so good to sponsor. Though after making this marvelous, complex dish; I’m starting to think that she might have been misnamed, as it appears that a tiny bit of a devilish streak lies hidden among all that domestic goodness and glamour. Have you ever seen one of those cartoons with the good angel and the bad angel sitting on the main character’s shoulders, giving opposite confusing advice? Then you know where I’m coming from here.

fish biryani

fish biryani

Okay I always promise myself whenever I’m about to cook Indian that I’ll get the spices out first, so I don’t get mixed up or forget anything, then proceed to the actual cooking adventure. But no, I didn’t do that again! Perhaps that was my evil angel’s counsel. I got dizzy from relentlessly having to go back and forth to the pantry and spinning the lazy-susan over and over and over again to locate the next needed spice for this dish. How funny that now that we have a new kitchen with a dedicated place for spices, I still find myself unable to find anything. I hope that one day they add some computerized artificial intelligence with a soothing voice to kitchen cabinets that will both find anything that I want via verbal-command and will calm me with his/her flattery and encouragement as I freak out at the stovetop. Then no more getting lost in the aromatic black hole I call my spice cabinet.

spice chaos as I look for ingredients for fish biryani

spice chaos as I look for ingredients for fish biryani

I must confess I think I have never made a dish that was so complicated. Lots of steps! I quite liked the result, but this was an effort. I am going to test the recipe again using spices in different proportions. I feel sure each time it will come out tasting slightly differently, so I can mix it up some. I’m excited to read about everyone else’s versions in the cook-off. You should be too. Follow these links for the other “contestants’” biryani masterpieces.

Heavenly Housewife from donuts to delirium
Vanessa from sweet artichoke
Glamorous Glutton
moinetteTeczcape: An Escape to Food
Laura from healthyjalapeno

fish biryani

Make Masala powder first. See below for recipe.

toasting the spices for the Masala powder

toasting the spices for the Masala powder

for the rice:

2 cup basmati rice
1 bay leaf
2 inch piece of cinnamon stick
Few peppercorns
¼ tsp kosher salt

Soak rice in plenty of water for about one hour. Drain. Place rice in a saucepan with 5 cups of water. Drop in salt, bay leaf, pepper corn, and parboil the rice for about 10 minutes. Do not overcook it! Drain and set aside.

for the fish:

1 lb monkfish cut into individual pieces, or any other firm white fish
Juice of 1 lemon
½ tsp turmeric powder
1 tsp chili powder
1 tbsp Masala powder*
1tsp coriander powder
1 tbsp ginger paste
1 tsp kosher salt

Make a paste by mixing lemon juice, garlic and ginger paste, salt and powders. Rub on fish pieces and marinate for about ½ hour. Keep it refrigerated if your kitchen gets too hot.

gently poaching the monkfish in the Masala sauce

gently poaching the monkfish in the Masala sauce

for the Masala sauce:

1 large onion, cut into thin half moon slices
4 ripe tomatoes, peeled and cubed
2 Serrano peppers, minced, ribs and seeds partially removed
½ bunch cilantro, chopped
A few mint leaves, julienned
1 tsp Aleppo pepper
¼ tsp turmeric powder
1 tsp fresh garlic paste
1 tsp fresh ginger paste
2 tbsp Masala powder *
1 bay leaf
1 tsp ajwain seeds
1 tsp black peppercorn
½ tsp allspice powder
¼ tsp clove powder
¼ tsp onion seeds
1½ cups plain yogurt
2 tbsp canola oil
A few strands saffron
1 tsp sugar

Add oil to a large skillet followed by onion and minced Serrano pepper. Cook until onion becomes wilted and translucent. Push onion to the side of skillet. Add ginger and garlic pastes, ajwain seeds, bay leaf, black peppercorn, Aleppo pepper, Masala powder, turmeric, allspice and clove powder, saffron, onion seeds, sugar and cook until raw smells dissipate. Add tomato, stir everything together and cook until tomatoes begin to dissolve. Mix yogurt with half cup of water and fold into the sauce. Carefully lay fish pieces over the Masala sauce, cover pan and cook on medium heat for about 8 minutes. Mix in cilantro and mint leaves.

At this point heat up the oven to 450F.

ready to layer the baking dish with rice and fish

ready to layer the baking dish with rice and fish

several layers of rice and fish to form my biryani

several layers of rice and fish to form my biryani

*for the Masala powder for fish

5 whole cloves
4 green cardamom pods
2 cinnamon sticks ~3 inch each
1 tsp fennel seeds
1 tsp cumin leaves
1 bay leaf
½ tsp grated nutmeg
1 tbsp ground coriander

Place cloves, cardamom, fennel and bay leaf in a saucepan; put it over burner over high heat. Dry roast spices for a few minutes until aromatic, being careful not to burn it. Transfer to a coffee grinder and pulverize. Mix in ground nutmeg and coriander. (My coriander was already ground, if you have seeds use them instead).

to assemble the fish biryani:

Using an oven-proof baking dish with a cover, assemble the biryani with one layer of rice, followed by a layer of fish masala, and finish with the remaining Masala sauce. Repeat so you end up with three or four layers of all ingredients. Cover and bake for about 30 minutes. The rice will finish cooking in the masala sauce without becoming overly cooked. Remove from oven and let it rest for about 10 minutes before serving.

If you haven’t had enough fish biryani yet, look here, here and here for other related versions.

{ 7 comments }

This is another great recipe from Tess Mallos’ North African Cooking. We served it after the mouthwatering broiled corvina in charmoula marinade, based on a recipe from the same book, the day our super good friend, Kristen, came into town. A meal with guests wouldn’t be complete without dessert, so this adaptation of basbousa, a semolina almond cake, was perfect.

basbousa  semolina almond cake

basbousa: semolina almond cake

The original calls for caster sugar and fine semolina; neither of which we had. So as usual, we improvised. I think that the fine sugar and semolina would’ve made the cake taste smoother. Though I actually enjoyed the rougher texture, as this way it reminded me of Brazilian corn cake, a perennial favorite.

basbousa: semolina almond cake

for the batter:

¼ cup butter
¾ cup sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract
2 eggs
2 cups semolina
1tsp baking powder
½ tsp baking soda
¾ cup plain whole milk yogurt
½ cup slivered blanched almonds

for the syrup:

2 cups sugar
1½ cups water
Juice of a large lemon

for the whipping cream:

1 cup heavy cream
Confectioners’ sugar

Preheat oven to 350F.

Beat together butter, sugar and vanilla until fluffy. Add eggs. Keep beating until fully incorporated. Meanwhile sift remaining dry batter ingredients together. Fold it into butter mix alternating it with yogurt. Fold in almonds. Transfer batter to a buttered 9 by 12 baking dish and bake for 30-35 minutes until a toothpick inserted comes out clean.

Begin making the syrup by dissolving sugar in water under moderate heat. Bring to a boil, add lemon juice and let liquid reduce by a third. Remove from heat and let cool down to room temperature. Pour syrup over hot cake right out of the oven.

pouring sweet lemon syrup over hot basbousa

pouring sweet lemon syrup over hot basbousa

Whip cream together with a tiny amount of Confectioner’s sugar until light and fluffy.

Plate cake slices on individual dessert dishes with a dollop of whipped cream.

{ 11 comments }

I wanted to subtitle this recipe, “rinse and repeat tropical style,” but decided against it at the last minute as it makes the name too long. Really, this is just a retread of my attempt to create Clotilde’s quince almond cake with the addition of some dried shredded coconut. Hegui was so enchanted by the underdone, first try, that when we came across another batch of quince, he clamored for more. So really, this is a “re-make” or a “re-do,” you choose your preferred term. The “tropical” is the coconut, of course, and our fervent longing for the return of summer. In Brazil, summer starts today. Don’t you wish you were on the beach somewhere right now, toasting under a warm tropical sun? I do, too!!!

bolo de marmelo com côco e amêndoas

bolo de marmelo com côco e amêndoas

This time, instead of lining my baking dish with wax paper, Hegui found for me some disposable wax paper forms which I was able to use without any other baking dish at all. I made a tiny loaf and a large ring cake with this recipe.

The name for the post is Portuguese for “quince cake with coconut and almonds.” And here it is in all its delicious glory:

bolo de marmelo com côco e amêndoas

2 fresh, ripe quince
¼ tsp vanilla
¼ cup brown sugar

1 2/3 cups flour
¾ cup ground almonds (I used whole almonds and pulverized them in a food processor)
½ cup dried shredded coconut
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
2 eggs
1 cup sugar
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1 cup plain yogurt
splash of rum
coarse sugar to sprinkle on top

To poach quince:

Peel quince with a vegetable peeler. Carefully cut quince into quarters and remove seeds, stems and inner fibrous parts. Cut quarters into about ½ inch cubes. Put cut cleaned quince into pressure cooker with vanilla and brown sugar. Cover with just enough water to submerge fruit. Cook for thirty minutes after pressure cooker starts to whistle. The fruit released a wonderful aroma while cooking and came out a stunning deep reddish color. Remove and allow to cool. Refrigerate overnight.

poached quince

poached quince

To prepare cake:

Preheat oven to 360F.

Drain quince and chop coarsely.

Mix flour, almonds, coconut, baking powder, baking soda and salt together. In a separate bowl, beat eggs and sugar together for a couple minutes. Add yogurt, rum and vegetable oil to egg mixture. Stir to incorporate. Fold quince into egg mixture. Gradually mix dry ingredients into moist. Once everything is wet, pour into baking dish. Sprinkle with coarse sugar. (I didn’t have this so used more regular sugar to sprinkle on top.)

Bake about one hour or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Let cool. Remove from dish and peel wax paper away. Serve. We had this as an after dinner treat and for breakfast. Yum!

Ubatuba, SP, Brazil

Ubatuba, SP, Brazil

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quince almond cake

by Stevie on December 10, 2010

The recipe for this marvelous quince and almond quick bread comes from the delightful Chocolate and Zucchini. I’ve recently stumbled across Clotilde’s site and have been a fan since. According to her “about,” she’s French and lives in the Montmartre neighborhood of Paris. Already that seems pretty glamorous, sitting as I do in my apartment in chilly, cloudy San Francisco. I’m amazed by many of her recipes as well as her modesty about them, as she is obviously a very talented chef. In fact, she has published a book and has been able to quit whatever job she was doing before to become a full-time food writer.

quince almond cake

quince almond cake

I’ve never made anything with quince before. I probably wouldn’t have made this bread, either, had we not bumped into a grocery that stocked the fruit fresh. It is not that common here from what I can tell.

I really enjoy working with a new key ingredient. Clotilde warns her readers to be careful about cutting fresh quince. I didn’t quite get the admonition until I prepared my own. These things, even when completely ripe, are incredibly tough! It would be very easy to accidentally cut off your whole hand! Be careful.

I improvised on some of her directions. For example, I did not have fresh vanilla pods so used some extract while poaching the quince. Also I sort of guessed on some of the quantities of things. For example, I ended up using one cup of yogurt which I think now was more than she recommended. Perhaps that is why my bread needed more time in the oven? I baked mine for about an hour but even so, part of the middle wasn’t quite done. Well, live and learn. Hegui’s convinced that if I had let the quince, yogurt and eggs get to room temperature before using them that the cake would have baked completely in the time that C recommended (40 minutes). Maybe so.

fresh quince

fresh quince

quince almond cake

2 fresh, ripe quince
¼ tsp vanilla
¼ cup brown sugar

1 2/3 cups flour
¾ cup ground almonds (I used whole almonds and pulverized them in a food processor)
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
¼ tsp salt
2 eggs
1 cup sugar
1/3 cup vegetable oil
1 cup plain yogurt
splash of rum
coarse sugar to sprinkle on top

To poach quince:

Peel quince with a vegetable peeler. Carefully cut quince into quarters and remove seeds, stems and inner fibrous parts. Cut quarters into about ½ inch cubes. Put cut cleaned quince into pressure cooker with vanilla and brown sugar. Cover with just enough water to submerge fruit. Cook for thirty minutes after pressure cooker starts to whistle. The fruit released a wonderful aroma while cooking and came out a stunning deep reddish color. Remove and allow to cool. Refrigerate overnight.

poached quince

poached quince

To prepare cake:

Preheat oven to 360F. Cover an 11-inch baking dish with wax or parchment paper. I used a glass oval shaped dish.

Drain quince and chop coarsely.

Mix flour, almonds, baking powder, baking soda and salt together. In a separate bowl, beat eggs and sugar together for a couple minutes. Add yogurt, rum and vegetable oil to egg mixture. Stir to incorporate. Fold quince into egg mixture. Gradually mix dry ingredients into moist. Once everything is wet, pour into baking dish. Sprinkle with coarse sugar. (I didn’t have this so used more regular sugar to sprinkle on top.)

Bake about one hour or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Let cool. Remove from dish and peel wax paper away. Serve. We had this as an after dinner treat and for breakfast. Yum!

{ 3 comments }

orange cling peach oatmeal cobbler

In hindsight, I think that the peach tree we had in our backyard when I was a kid had to have been an Orange Cling. The fruit were never as big as these ones I got the other day at the Alemany farmers market. Perhaps they’re “super-sized” to look more attractive? Whatever the reason, these peaches are the bomb!

Usually, I don’t go for fruit that much at all. But the sweet and tart aroma from these was so intoxicating that I couldn’t resist. The couple selling these beauties had nothing else in their stall at the market. They knew a good thing, that’s for sure. I ate a couple of peaches as soon as I got home, channeling Gary Paul Nabhan for sure! Steven suggested I made a cobbler with the rest. (Was that in the book, too?)

beautiful and aromatic orange cling peaches

beautiful and aromatic orange cling peaches

orange cling peach oatmeal cobbler

6 orange cling peaches, pits removed, cut into wedges
9 tbsp sugar
½ cup flour
½ cup oatmeal
1 tsp baking soda
Pinch salt
½ stick cold butter cut into small pieces
5 tbsp Kefir yogurt

Pre-heat oven to 350F.

Place peach slices in the bottom of a glass baking dish. Sprinkle with 4 tbsp sugar. Mix dry ingredients and remaining sugar together. Add butter and mix with your fingers until it becomes crumbly. Fold in Kefir yogurt.

Using a spatula, place blobs of batter over peaches. Bake for about 40 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the dough comes out clean. The crust becomes a dark golden color. Remove from oven and let it rest for 10 to 20 minutes. Serve with your favorite ice cream or by itself. Yumm!

orange cling peach oatmeal cobbler ready for the oven


orange cling peach oatmeal cobbler cooling off

This oatmeal crust reminded us a lot of the stunning oatmeal pancakes that they serve at Just for You Bakery Café. We’re still looking for a recipe for that, so more to come!

orange cling peach oatmeal cobbler is perfect for a clear warm night

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Kashmiri eggplant

by Heguiberto on June 1, 2010

I am enchanted with the Ajanta: Regional Feasts of India cookbook by Lachu Moorjani. I’ve been really engrossed by it since discovering it at Viks Chaat Corner on our food excursion to Berkeley a few weeks ago.

Kashmiri eggplant

It caught my attention because it was the only book for sale at that place. That might normally put someone off, but, since I enjoyed the food at Viks so much, I thought that perhaps the Viks chef may have read the book and given it the “Viks Chaat Corner Seal of Approval.” Therefore, it must be good.

Well, I looked in vain for the golden seal. But it turns out that Ajanta didn’t need help from anyone. Lachu has a restaurant, also called Ajanta, somewhere in Berkeley. I have yet to try it, but hope to very soon.

What’s cool about Ajanta is that the recipes are organized both by region in India and in such a way that you could create an entire multi-course meal of traditional foods from a single region. Or you could mix and match, like we did this time.

Today’s dish is called Badal Jaam. It’s a Kashmiri dish made with eggplants, tomatoes, yogurt and spices. I love eggplant and I was amazed by how tasty it turned out to be. We served it with a basmati mung bean pilaf that was adapted from the same book, though from a different region: Sindh.

Kashmiri eggplant

2 medium eggplant cut into 2/3 inch thick rounds
Kosher salt
Vegetable oil for frying
6 ripe Roma tomatoes, chopped fine
6 garlic cloves chopped fine
1 medium onion, chopped
2 tbsp Hungarian paprika
2 tbsp amchur powder (mango powder)
2 tbsp cumin seeds
1 tbsp coriander seeds
1 tbsp crushed red pepper
1 cup thick Greek yogurt
1 inch thick piece of ginger, peeled and grated fine

Some sliced cherry tomatoes and coriander leaves for garnishing

Sprinkle eggplant slices with salt, and place them in a colander to sweat for about 45 minutes. Rinse with plenty of water and dry them with paper towels.

Fill a frying pan with about 1/4 inch of oil. Bring temperature to medium high and fry eggplant slices for about 4 minutes per side. Eggplant will turn brown, the skin will shrink a bit and the centers will be soft when pinched with a fork. Remove from pan and place on more paper towels to soak up excess oil.

Add 2 tbsp of oil to a sauce pan then bring temperature to high. Add ginger and garlic and sauté for about a minute. Add onion and continue sautéing until onion becomes soft and translucent. Add Hungarian paprika, salt and tomato. Bring to a boil then lower to simmer. Cook for about 50 minutes. A sign that it’s ready is when the sauce becomes very thick and the oil separates and floats on top.

preparing the eggplant slices for the oven

Add cumin and coriander seeds to a skillet and toast them for about a minute or until aromatic. Transfer to a coffee grinder and pulse until fine. Mix with mango powder, some salt and crushed red pepper.

Pre heat oven to 285F.

Arrange eggplant slices in a single layer on a glass dish. Place a dollop of tomato sauce on top of each slice. Top with spice powder mix. Cover with aluminum foil and bake for about 30 minutes. Remove from oven.

To serve, gently remove each eggplant slice to a serving platter. Place a spoonful of yogurt over each then decorate with coriander leaves and sliced cherry tomatoes.

There are a lot of steps to this. I prepared and baked the eggplant the day before serving them. Then on Monday when Steven came home from work, he re-heated the eggplant then garnished them with yogurt, etc. The meal was really good and a huge upgrade from regular Monday fare.

One last note, the author recommends dressing the yogurt with lime juice, fresh crushed garlic and salt… we didn’t get to that point but will try it next time.

Kashmiri eggplant with mung bean pilaf and store bought mango chutney

{ 6 comments }

Recently Hegui took up this book, Curry: A Tale of Cooks and Conquerors. Among other things, it says that the words “polow,” “pilau,” “paella,” and “pilaf” all essentially mean the same thing: a dish made of rice mixed with other ingredients. That’s interesting.

Shirazi baked saffron polow with spinach

Today’s polow comes from my favorite, Silk Road Cooking: A Vegetarian Journey! I’ve been wanting to make this for a while, but have met with some resistance at home. Hegui wasn’t excited by the Madras mustard seed and yogurt pullao, apparently because he doesn’t like yogurt that much. But my friend, Heather, has been going on and on about how great some of these unmolded Persian rice dishes taste. Plus the tiny photo in the cookbook itself enticed me. Finally, we had a dinner party for six, and the time had come.

I didn’t have crystallized orange peel. The recipe calls for a quarter cup. Instead, I substituted orange zest. That likely made the final dish less sweet, which is another thing that bothers H about some of these Silk Road rice dishes. He doesn’t like them sweet. Too bad for me. I loved Susa polow with lentils, currants and dates.

Since it was a party, I went ahead and used butter and the whole egg (instead of the whites only). Cholesterol be damned! I used a cinnamon stick instead of powdered cinnamon and mixed sunflower and pumpkin seeds instead of pine nuts. I had the seeds already and hate to spend so much for pine nuts.

This dish looks stunning served on a buffet. I really enjoyed it at the time and for the next couple of days, the leftovers were wonderful, too. Next time, I might cut the recipe in half and prepare it in a smaller casserole. Najmieh Batmanglij says it makes six servings, but that must be if you’re not eating anything else besides. It was a lot of food!

The final dish really didn’t taste that yogurt-y or sweet. The outer layer is sort of spongy which was fun.

some key ingredients for Shirazi baked saffron polow with spinach

Shirazi Baked Saffron Polow with Spinach

2/3 cups melted butter or oil
2 onions, thinly sliced
6 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
1 tsp. cumin
1 cinnamon stick
¼ tsp. ground nutmeg
1 lb. baby spinach
1½ cups pitted prunes
1 cup raw sunflower seeds and/or pumpkin seeds, toasted
3 cups basmati rice
3 eggs
2 cups plain yogurt
½ cup milk
½ tsp. ground saffron in 2 tbsp. hot water
Zest of an orange
Kosher salt
1 tsp. black pepper

Heat two tbsp. butter in a large skillet and sauté onion for about fifteen minutes on medium until golden. Add garlic and cumin and fry for a minute more. Add cinnamon stick, nutmeg and spinach. Cover and cook until spinach wilts, about five minutes. Add prunes and seeds. Set aside.

Wash basmati rice thoroughly. Boil eight cups of water with two tablespoons of salt. Add rice and boil for six minutes. Drain and rinse rice with three cups of cold water. It will not be completely coked but will finish in the oven.

Preheat oven to 420F.

Combine eggs, yogurt, milk, saffron water, orange zest, two tsp. salt and black pepper in a large bowl. Beat. Fold half of cooked rice into yogurt mixture.

Pour ¼ cup melted butter into a 9×13 inch baking dish and coat bottoms and sides well. Pour rice and yogurt mixture into bottom of dish. Spread it evenly. Spread spinach filling over yogurt rice. Finally cover with remaining basmati rice. Press everything firmly into baking dish. Drizzle with remaining butter.

Butter one side of a sheet of aluminum foil and then cover casserole tightly. Bake for 1½ hours until crust becomes browned.

Remove from oven and place on a damp cloth. Let dish rest, covered, for fifteen minutes. Then, to unmold, remove foil and with a knife, gently separate edges of polow from sides of dish. Then invert a serving platter over casserole and flip it into the platter. I was worried about this step but it was a breeze!

Garnish with herbs and serve in slices.

{ 1 comment }

Madras mustard seed and yogurt pullao

January 13, 2010

I’ve been inspired by the success of my recent attempt at Georgian pilaf with tart cherries to try some more recipes from Najmieh Batmanglij’s remarkable book, Silk Road Cooking: A Vegetarian Journey. Most of her rice recipes are unfamiliar to me and use ingredients that I’d not thought of putting in rice before. Last time […]

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feta zucchini borek

July 21, 2009

For the Macedonian party we had the other day I made borek. This classic dish also goes by börek or burek depending on the nationality of origin. Aleks introduced me to it the last time we went over for BBQ at his place and I fell in love with it. It was lightly pan fried […]

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