endive

This recipe was adapted from Plenty by Yottam Otholenghi. I remain a huge fan his book. We’ve prepared many of his recipes, often more than once: a total success at home, as you can see here: Ottolenghi’s roasted eggplant, sambal okra, and chickpeas with chard. Mmmm!

endive with Point Reyes blue cheese and crème fraîche

endive with Point Reyes blue cheese and crème fraîche

This is another yummy recipe. It is decadent as it is loaded with dairy, but I think it’s a-okay to indulge every now and then. The watery crunchiness of the endive combined with the creamy texture of this sauce is divine!

Funny thing is that I made this salad right after we came back from France. Could we be suffering from dairy deprivation so soon?

endive with Point Reyes blue cheese and crème fraîche

3 heads white endive, leaves separated, rinsed and dried
1 head red endive, leaves separated, rinsed and dried
a small portion of micro greens, rinsed and dried
freshly ground black pepper to taste
1/3 cup walnuts, slightly toasted, with sprinkle of salt, cooled to room temperature
Kosher salt to taste
whole leaves of Iceberg lettuce
1 cup crème fraîche
2 tbsp water
~4 tbsp crumbled Point Reyes Monterrey blue cheese

In a bowl whisk together crème fraîche, water, blue cheese, some salt and pepper. Taste it and adjust flavor adding more of any of the ingredients. It should have a somewhat runny texture; taste savory, with that punchy flavor that you expect from a good blue cheese. Toss the sauce with the endive. To serve, pile seasoned endive over iceberg lettuce leaf cups on individual dishes, top with micro greens and toasted walnuts.

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kiwi fennel ceviche

by Heguiberto on February 1, 2011

Last Saturday we practiced a day of casual hedonism. It was one of those typical rainy and cold ones that drearily says “winter” in San Francisco. Not to be put out by Mother Nature’s uncooperativeness, my work friend, Chris, joined us for an afternoon of wine tasting, then cooking at home, more drinking, and watching re-runs of Star Trek and Star Wars movies over a large platter of last minute nachos until 2AM. Who needs sunshine to have fun?

kiwi fennel ceviche

kiwi fennel ceviche

We started at our favorite wine store, K&L. They were featuring wines from the Rhône in France. The event showcased delicious reds from Châteauneuf to Cornas to Côte Rotie to Hermitage. We had lots of fun and it was easier than an afternoon trip to France 😉 Afterward, we were hungry so went shopping at a couple of places for sardines, clams, French cheese and pasta for an early dinner.

We munched on the cheeses for a while as we sipped some of the K&L treasures we had brought home. Then it was time to get serious in the kitchen. I cleaned and fried the sardines, made linguine with little neck clams in white wine sauce and this kiwi fennel ceviche.

This light, aromatic and very flavorful salad is fish-free, so this is only “ceviche” in the sense that it is marinated in citrus. It was a snap to make, looked lovely and tasted even better.

kiwi fennel ceviche

2 small fennel bulbs, sliced paper thin using a mandolin
½ small white onion, sliced paper thin then rinsed in cold water
5 grape tomatoes, halved
1 lemon, juiced
1 large kiwi, peeled and sliced
kosher salt to taste
freshly ground black pepper to taste
½ tsp sugar
lettuce or endive leaves (to serve)

Toss all ingredients together with exception of kiwi. Let salad macerate at room temperature for about ½ hour. Serve individual portions on top of lettuce leaves and top with slices of kiwi. It is a very refreshing salad.

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Tabouli is a Middle East dish that is very popular in Brazil. It arrived there with Lebanese immigrants and became so integrated into Brazilian culinary traditions that for me it has always been comfort food.

tabouli with endive and escarole

tabouli with endive and escarole

The basic ingredients for traditional tabouli are cracked wheat, lime juice, good olive oil, tomatoes, cucumber, salt and pepper. In Brazil we like to do things differently, so we go a little crazy with fresh herbs and leafy vegetables. Endive and escarole have a distinct bitter taste, which adds a stimulating depth to this otherwise traditional dish. Steven didn’t even complain! That really must say something. Though now that I’ve gotten him to eat the stuff, how do you pair red wine with bitter greens such as dandelion, treviso, radicchio, sow thistle and so on and on?

I think that the secret to tabouli, and really any good food, is to make it with the freshest ingredients that you can find. I served this dish as a side to mushroom-pink bean loaf (it’s a funny name, though better than “vegetarian meat loaf,” don’t you think? It truly looked a bit pink, but the taste was out of this world!)

tabouli with endive and escarole

2 cups coarse cracked wheat (bulgur), pre-soaked in water for 2 hours, drained
½ bunch Italian parley, chopped
½ bunch mint, chopped
1 red endive chopped
1 white endive, chopped
4 fresh Texas spring onions (those spring onions with a little bulb attached to it), chopped
10 leaves escarole, chopped
10 pearl tomatoes, halved
½ English cucumber, cut into thin half moons and soaked in salted cold water for 10 min, then rinsed
Juice of about 5 limes
Kosher salt to taste
Freshly ground black pepper to taste
½ cup extra virgin Arbequina olive oil

Place the first 9 ingredients in a large bowl and gently mix with a spatula or by hand. Add salt, freshly ground pepper. Squeeze in lime juice and add olive oil. Toss it again. Taste and adjust flavors. Let it sit at room temperature for about 10 minutes before serving. Yumm!

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